How is Reporting Data broken down?

The heading of a credit report is normally found at the very top and right of the report. It will contain the Credit Bureau's information, the Companies name, address, phone number, and the date the credit report was pulled.

Personal Information

This section of the credit report is your personal information. It includes your name, social security number, date of birth, and phone number (if available), and up to three different addresses.

Your most recent address appears directly below your name with your previous addresses appearing below your name in chronological order. Your employment and birth date information will appear to the right of your addresses and above the summary score. This information is only available if it was inputted when you applied for credit.

Employment History and Information

This section of the credit report will contain your employment history and information. This may include the company name, occupation, income, hire date, and release date if available.

This information along with personal information gets reported on your credit report by an individual inputting the information when you apply for credit.

Credit Report Accounts Summary

This section of the credit report will contain your employment history and information. This may include the company name, occupation, income, hire date, and release date if available.

This section of your credit report is a summary of all your credit history. It will tell you the total number of accounts you have, accounts that are still active or negative, accounts that are paid off or past due, inquiries, public records, accounts in collections, total amounts still paying, or owed and breakdowns of those amounts.

Credit Report Score or Scorecard Section

There are many names for the number score on your credit bureau, FICO, Beacon, Beacon Score, Bureau Score, or Empirica to name a few. It is normally located above your trade and credit information and is the overall rating of your credit history. There are up to 4 factors disclosed and are displayed based on their impact of the final score.

  • Normally scores above 625 are worthy of loans from banks.
  • Scores range from the low 400's to the high's of 850.
  • Scores over 800 are seldom seen, these individuals have very good credit and most qualify for special interest rates and programs.
  • Scores above 700 are considered very good. Most qualify for special rates and terms without any added documentation.
  • The most common scores range between 600 and 700 and most are considered very good, depending on the depth of your credit you may have to provide extra documentation to be approved for a loan. You may or may not fall into the most exclusive car buyer's rates but you will most likely not have to pay the sub-prime rates.
  • Scores 600 and below are considered risky or sub-prime and will warrant further proof and documentation to be qualified for a loan. You may have to pay much higher interest rates, put a larger down payment down, show proof of residence, proof of home phone, proof of income and provide the lender with personal references.
  • If you have no score or it is not available, it means that you have no credit history and no one has ever inquired for your history also. You can look on your report under your name and see if the "On File Since" is the same date as you inquired for your report. If it's the same you've just created your own credit file.

Collections Section

This section of your credit report will identify your accounts that have been sent to professional debt collecting firms. Collection information will include the name of the collection agency providing the information, the collector's kind of business designators, and the collector's account number for your account.

This information will also include the date the original creditor charged off the amount, date the amount was verified, the original dollar amount of the collection, balance owed as of the date closed or verified, explanation of current account status reported by the collection agency and the name of the original creditor.

Public Records

This section of your credit report will identify your accounts that have been sent to professional debt collecting firms. Collection information will include the name of the collection agency providing the information, the collector's kind of business designators, and the collector's account number for your account.

This section of your credit report will show if there are any civil actions with dollar amounts awarded, they normally appear towards the top of your credit report below the score summary in an area named Public Records. This information consists of liens, civil actions against you, foreclosures, and bankruptcies.

The public records section also includes the account's name and number, filing date with court, status date, if status is released, vacated, satisfied, dismissed or discharged, type and amount of public record, docket or certificate number and code describing your association to the public record item per the Equal Credit Opportunity Act. The plaintiff name, asset amounts and liability for bankruptcies and voluntary indicator for bankruptcies also.

Trades or Trade Lines

The trades' section of your credit report is where creditors report credit cards and loan amounts with their payment histories. The creditor's name is in the left column, credit amount is in the center, and the payment history is in the right column. This section provides a breakdown by month your payment history.

Payment History and Codes

On the far right hand side of your credit report you will normally find your payment history for the past 24 months. Codes reflect the monthly status of your accounts and are displayed for balance reporting loans.

Charge-offs and collections are not graded. Some codes have different meanings on different credit reports. I have listed all the different meanings to each code. Here are the definitions of the codes.

In addition to the above codes, beside each account on your report there will be a letter designating your relationship to that account. This is what those letters mean.

Using the above coding you can go to the column on your personal credit report and the following alphanumeric combinations would be good indications that you have outstanding credit history: R1, I1, or O1. You would not want to find or see any of these 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,or 9's.

Credit Report Inquiries

This part of your credit report is a list of the companies that have inquired about your credit history, usually to extend new or additional credit to you. Numerous inquiries will lower your score by about 2 points per inquiry.

Warnings and Messages

The warnings and messages section of your credit report is usually the last section on the report. This section lists any messages that have to do about your credit, name, address or social security number. There may even be a persona message to call a number to verify that the person using your credit history is the actual person it belongs too.

Don't let the lender know more about your credit history and score than you do. This puts you at a serious disadvantage and could end up costing you thousands of dollars.

The warnings and messages section of your credit report is usually the last section on the report. This section lists any messages that have to do about your credit, name, address or social security number. There may even be a persona message to call a number to verify that the person using your credit history is the actual person it belongs too.

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